Uri Avnery – Crusaders and Zionists

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We, all of us who read this and other blogs,  are part of a large movement on the net exposing the underbelly of the fascist beast that no longer wants to "pay" for their access to our resources and wealth.  Now they just want to steal it without accountability for doing so.  We are coming into a time where creativity and thinking outside the box, is now more important than ever before.  Lets keep the light of exposure on these people and ruin their plans for their Global take over and needed WW III. 

Vatic Note:  I wonder if those young Khazars realize that they are not Jewish, and they fly an occult symbol on their flag?  I understand so much more now about the New Testament and our Lord's comments about the Pharisees and the  Sadducees.  

This article triggered thoughts about how deceptive these professional clergy truly are & how they have fooled their population causing them to engage in crimes against humanity.   Lets see if they end up like the Nazi's did in WW II, condemned by the Nuremberg Courts for their attempted Genocide and inhumane  treatment of those under their control.   

Uri Avnery – Crusaders and Zionists
by Jim W. Dean,  Editor,  Veterans Today, 10/11/2014

Young Jerusalem Day
Young Jerusalem Day

 Crusaders  and  Zionists

… by  Uri Avnery,     … with  Gush Shalom 

It is getting late. We must decouple ourselves from the Crusaders, ancient and modern. 132 years after the arrival of the first modern Zionists in Palestine, it is high time for us to define ourselves as we really are: a new nation born in this country, belonging to this region, natural allies of its struggle for freedom.” Uri
"Every man woman and child." - Better luck next tim Uri.“Every man woman and child.”Better luck next time Uri. (VN: Notice the blood on the clothes and bodies?  Thats how you can tell a false flag from a real event.)
[ Editor’s note:  Good gosh Uri, This was one of your more incredible cover ups for the horrors of Zionism, but I must say this was entertaining. The invaders always claim to be “of the country”, as you say, but enforces his position with the sword.
Thanks for the admission of the no defined borders, but you conveniently left out the no constitution, like you always do.
The Zionist cruelty that you apologize for occasionally would make any modern Crusaders feel validated. They at least believed in their religion in their own murderous way, not unsimilar to Israeli Orthodox Talmudic supremacists today, who live a life of subsidy in Israel from cradle to grave.
The KKK in America was never treated with such honors, despite their similar ideas on supremacy. They weren’t taxpayer supported. Uri — the ISIL, like you and your Zionist buddies, also want “to define themselves as they really are: a new nation born in this country, belonging to this region, natural allies of its struggle for freedom.”  I hope you can see just a bit of irony, or on your part… hypocrisy there.
Sure, they have chopped off some heads, but Israel and the US have had their own head-choppers running around Syria, killing children, raping women, and I have not heard of a single shame suicide over it yet in Washington or Tel Aviv. 
As for the winner for the late-summer killing surge, we’re not sure whether the Zios dispatched more in Gaza than the ISIL Jihadis have in the Neo-Caliphate. And yes, both of you claim your victims had it coming.  (VN: it has been proven that ISIL was created and funded by CIA and Mossad, along with MI6, so how does one reconcile that fact?  And justify it as well? )
Abe Foxman once told young Germans that maybe after a few more generations they would be off the reparations hook.
Abe Foxman once told young Germans that maybe after a few more generations they would be off the reparations hook.
You point out how ISIL uses the term Crusader to include all Christian Westerners. It is an obvious collective-guilt manipulation; but, who has exploited that more than so many Jews all over the world who have head-tripped all non-Jews that they are guilty?
That put them on the tab for reparations to the Jewish Crusaders in Jerusalem, paid one way… or another. But you are right to fear the analogy between you and the Crusaders. What all Jihadi Jews fear most is being held accountable for their sins and indiscretions.
You, for example, have never mentioned Israel’s use of WMD and extensive history of state-sponsored terrorism inside and outside of Israel. You remain unrepentant, just like a Crusader.
In that regard, you share a brotherhood with the 9-11 dancing-Israelis jumping for joy watching the World Trade Towers come down, and knowing the two jammers they had placed on top of two buildings would add to the carnage, with poor communication among the first responders.
The jammers were made in Israel, Uri. This little missive is national-security classified, as someone feared it might hurt US-Israeli relations.
So yes, the Crusader shoe fits. And as the last Crusader was thrown into the sea off the jetty in Acre, so I wish to see the same thing happen to the last unrepentant Zionist before I die. And I do hope it is righteous Jews doing the heaving — as that will be a fine ending to an old book, and the start of a new… Jim W. Dean ]
Editor’s note:  I want to thank Jim W. Dean.  We are awash with this form of “controlled opposition,” Uri’s lifelong effort to use his considerable writing talent on behalf of childish deflection and intellectual asininity. The civilized world, such as it is, has written off Israel forever.  Nothing can be done about this.  It is as though Uri plans to live forever, endlessly jousting with rationality on behalf of controlling dialog.
Why should the world care about Israel’s Jews?  Anyone come up with a reason?  An over-generalization would be to call Israel a nasty little place filled with hypocrites and fiends but people might think I am talking about Washington or New York.
Israel is the classic welfare state where Jews who can’t make it in the real world enjoy special status, American welfare, genocidal police state privileges and the company of those the rest of the world, Jews included, can do without.g
Israel has a long history of killing children as part of the collective punishment
Israel has a long history of killing children as part of its collective punishment – Of course if Jews anywhere were treated like this they would sing a different tune.

-  First published   …   October 11, 2014  -

The Civilizing process
The Civilizing process

Lately, the words “Crusaders” and “Zionists” have been appearing more and more often as twins. In a documentary about ISIS I just saw, they appeared together in almost every sentence uttered by the Islamist fighters, including teenagers.

Some sixty years ago I wrote an article whose title was just that: “Crusaders and Zionists”. Perhaps it was the first on that subject.
It raised a lot of opposition. At the time, it was a Zionist article of faith that no such similarity existed, tut-tut-tut. Unlike the Crusaders, the Jews are a nation.

Unlike the Crusaders, who were barbarians compared to the civilized Muslims of their time, Zionists are technically superior. Unlike the Crusaders, the Zionists relied on their own manual labor. (That was before the Six-Day War, of course.)

I have already told the story several times of my attachment to the Crusaders’ history, but I can’t resist the temptation to tell it again. During the 1948 war my commando unit was fighting in the South. When the war ended, a narrow strip of land along the Mediterranean Sea remained in Egyptian hands. We called it the “Gaza Strip” and built outposts around it.
Steven Runciman’s A History of the Crusades
A few years later, I read Steven Runciman’s monumental “A History of the Crusades”. My attention was immediately drawn to a curious coincidence: after the First Crusade, a strip of territory along the sea was left in the hands of the Egyptians, extending a few kilometers beyond Gaza. The Crusaders built a string of fortifications to contain it. They were in almost the same places as our own outposts.

Runciman's History of the Crusades
Runciman’s History of the Crusades

When I finished reading the three volumes, I did something I never did before or since: I wrote a letter to the author. After praising the work, I asked: Did you ever think about the similarity between them and us?

The answer arrived within days. Not only did he think about it, Runciman wrote, but he thought about it all the time. Indeed, he wanted to subtitle the book “A guide for the Zionists on how not to do it”. However, he added, “my Jewish friends advised against it.” If I ever chanced to pass through London, he added, he would be glad if I called on him.

I happened to be in London a few months later and called him. He asked me to come over immediately. The name Runciman was familiar to me: his father, Walter, a viscount, was sent by Neville Chamberlain in 1938 to mediate between Nazi Germany and the Czechs, and scandalized the world by greeting the Germans with “Heil Hitler”.

Steven Runciman
Steven Runciman
Steven Runciman answered the bell himself, a tall British gentleman of about fifty. Being an incurable anglophile, I was enchanted by his courteous aristocratic manner.

After a glass of sherry, we sank into a discussion of the Crusader-Zionist parallel, and lost all sense of time. For hours we compared events and names. Who was the Crusader Herzl (Pope Urban), who the Crusader Ben-Gurion? (Godfrey? Baldwin?), who the Zionist Reynald of Chatillon (Moshe Dayan), who the Israeli Raymond of Tripoli, who advocated peace with the Muslims? (Runciman graciously pointed to me).

Years later, Runciman invited my wife and me to Scotland, where he had moved to live in an old watchtower near Lockerbie, built as a defense against England. Over dinner served by a lone manservant he spoke about the ghosts haunting the place. Rachel and I were astonished when we realized that he really believed in them.

Uri and Rachel

Uri and Rachel
The two historical movements were separated by at least six centuries, and their political, social, cultural and military backgrounds are, of course, totally different. But some similarities are evident.

Both the Crusaders and the Zionists (as well as the Philistines before them) invaded Palestine from the West. They lived with their backs to the sea and Europe, facing the Muslim-Arab world. They lived in permanent war.

At the time, Jews identified with the Arabs. The horrible massacres of the Jewish communities along the Rhine committed by some Crusaders on their way to the Holy Land are deeply imprinted in Jewish consciousness. Upon conquering Jerusalem, the Crusaders committed another heinous crime by slaughtering all Muslim and Jewish inhabitants, men women and children, wading “to their knees in blood”, as a Christian chronicler put it.

Haifa, one of the last towns to fall to the Crusaders, was fiercely defended by its Jewish inhabitants, fighting shoulder to shoulder with the Muslim garrison.
I was brought up hating the Crusaders, but I was not conscious of the abysmal hatred Muslims felt for them until I asked the Arab-Israeli writer Emil Habibi to sign a manifesto for an Israeli-Palestinian partnership over Jerusalem.

In it, I had listed all the cultures that had in the past enriched the city. When Habibi saw that I had included the Crusaders, he refused to sign. “They were a bunch of murderers!” he exclaimed. I had to omit them.
When Arabs couple us with the Crusaders, they clearly want to say that we, too, are foreign intruders, strangers to this country and this region. That’s why the comparison is so dangerous. If the Arabs entertain such a deep hatred for the Crusaders after six centuries, how are they ever to become reconciled with us?

On the off chance that we are capable of learning from history…

The last crusaders were literally thrown into the sea from the jetty of the Fortress of Acre
Instead of wasting our time on the debate about whether we are similar or not, we would be well advised to learn from the Crusaders’ history. The first lesson concerns the question of identity. Who are we? Are we Europeans facing a hostile region? Are we “a wall against Asiatic barbarism”, as Theodor Herzl proclaimed? Are we “a villa in the jungle”, according to the famous dictum of Ehud Barak?
In short, do we see ourselves as belonging to this region or as Europeans who accidentally landed on the wrong continent? To my mind, this is the basic question of Zionism, going back to its first day, and dictating everything they have done to this very day. In my booklet “War or Peace in the Semitic Region”, which I published on the eve of the 1948 war, I posed this question in the very first sentence.
For the Crusaders, this was not a question at all. They were the flower of European knighthood and they came to fight the Saracens. They made Hudnas (truces) with Arab rulers, mainly the emirs of Damascus, but fighting Islam was their very raison d’etre. The few advocates of peace and reconciliation, like the aforementioned Raymond of Tripoli, were despised outsiders.

Israel is in a similar situation. True, we never admit that we want war — it is always the Arabs who refuse peace. But from its first day, the State of Israel has refused to fix its borders, being ever ready for expansion by force – exactly like the Crusaders.

Bedouin "Resettlement," by Israel, also known as ethnic cleansing
Bedouin “Resettlement,” by Israel, also known as ethnic cleansing
Today, 66 years after the founding of our state, more than half of the daily news in our media concerns the war with the Arabs, inside and outside Israel. Last week, our Minister of Agriculture, Ya’ir Shamir, demanded that we take urgent measures to limit the birthrate of the Bedouins in the Negev – like Pharaoh in the biblical story.

Israel suffers from a deep-seated sense of existential insecurity, which finds its expression in myriad forms. Since Israel is in many ways a conspicuous success story and a world-class military power, this sense of insecurity often gives rise to wonderment.
I believe that its root is this feeling of not belonging to the region in which we live, of being a villa in the jungle, which really means being a fortified ghetto in the region. It could be said that this feeling is natural, since most Israelis are of European descent. But that is not true. 20% of Israeli citizens are Arabs.  (VN: does that include those that sought asylum from Israel, in New York and London?)
At least half of the Jews have come here (they or their parents) from Arab countries, where they spoke Arabic and listened to Arab music. The greatest Sephardi thinker, Moses Maimonides (Rambam in Hebrew) spoke and wrote Arabic and was the personal physician of the great Salah ad-Din (Saladin). He was as much an Arab Jew as Baruch Spinoza was a Portuguese Jew and Moses Mendelssohn a German Jew.

Maimonides the philosopher
Maimonides the philosopher

Were the Crusaders a small aristocratic minority in their state, as Zionist historians always contend? Depends on how you count. When the first Crusaders arrived in Palestine, the majority of the population was still Christian of various Eastern sects. However, the Catholic invaders did look upon them as inferior strangers.

The Poulains, as they were called, were despised and discriminated against. They felt themselves closer to the Arabs than to the hated “Franks”, and did not mourn when these were finally ejected. Most of these Christians later converted to Islam, and were the forefathers of many of today’s Muslim Palestinians.

Another lesson is to treat immigration seriously. In Crusader society, there was a constant coming and going. Just now, a flaming debate about immigration is going on in Israel. Young people, mostly well educated, with their children, are leaving for Berlin and other European and American cities.
Every year, Israelis look anxiously at the balance sheet: how many were driven to Israel by anti-Semitism, how many were driven by war and right-wing extremism back to Europe? This was a tragedy for the Crusaders.
One main reason for the Zionist rejection of the Crusader parallel is their sorry end. After almost 200 years in Palestine, with many ups and downs, the last Crusaders were literally thrown into the sea from the jetty of Acre. As the former underground chief and prime minister, Yitzhak Shamir, the father of Ya’ir, was fond of saying: “The sea is the same sea and the Arabs are the same Arabs.” Of course, the Crusaders had no nuclear bombs and no German submarines.

When ISIS and other Arabs use the term Crusaders, they do not mean only the medieval invaders. They mean all American and European Christians. When they speak about Zionists, they mean all Jewish Israelis, and often all Jews.

I believe that this coupling of the two terms is extremely dangerous for us. I am not afraid of ISIS’ military capabilities, which are negligible, but of the power of their ideas. No American bomber is going to eradicate these.
It is getting late. We must decouple ourselves from the Crusaders, ancient and modern. 132 years after the arrival of the first modern Zionists in Palestine, it is high time for us to define ourselves as we really are: a new nation born in this country, belonging to this region, natural allies of its struggle for freedom.
Tel Aviv sunset
Tel Aviv sunset

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