10 Urban Farming Projects Flourishing in Boston

***Fund raising status We wish to thank all those who have contributed to  our fund raising efforts so far this month. We realize the hardship this maybe causing, since everyone is in the same boat, so the gifting is even more precious for that fact.

Our deficit, is still at $180 with only 3 days left before the due date, and additionally, its a short month of only 28 days so it is actually crunch time right now.  So if you have benefited in anyway from our work, then please help us stay up by donating at the Pay Pal button off to the right of the blog.  We realize, as we said before, that this is a tough time for everyone.  It maybe time to move onto another level of activity, so if you are unable to donate, please at least work to bring about good change to our brutally battered nation.  Do it for the children. Its why I was doing this.... for the children.

If we do not make it, then we will definitely keep this blog up for a reference and education aid to those you refer here or even if you need a refresher, you would be welcome here to use it as you see fit.   God bless and keep  you all safe and happy.  I feel its been a seriously productive 4 years we have had on here. I regret none of it.

Vatic Note:   Our county, about two years ago, passed an ordinance and budget for building 3 major greenhouses to be located at the two ends of town and one for in the middle.   So far 1 is done being built at one end of town, and the others are in progress, and it will be worked by the residents of the town in exchange for their participation in harvesting the food for themselves and their families.

These will be built to grow all year round with sunshine and heat.  Looks like everyone is beginning to go back to the hunterer, gatherer roots.    Maybe this is a good thing these edomite satanists did for us without us knowing it.  Just a thought to consider.   As we get closer to the soil, so we get closer to God.

That has always been the case.  There is a deep connection between our spiritual body and the acts of physical work to sustain life and when you see the journey a plant goes through from seed to harvest, it triggers something deep within us that connects to God.  I am beginning to look forward to the journey.

10 Urban Farming Projects Flourishing in Boston
by John Deike, EcoWatch, Waking Times, 2/20/2014

Urban agriculture and the local food movement are flourishing as farms and gardens continue to pop up across Boston’s inner-city sprawl.
To highlight the green movement, Food Tank created a top ten list of the city’s most innovative urban agriculture projects.

1. Berkeley Community Garden, a community of 140 farmers in Boston’s South End, grows a variety of fruits, vegetables and herbs, including bitter melon, cilantro, chinese long beans and broccoli. The garden also provides helpful tips and resources to gardeners, and is one of the only city gardens open to the public.

2. Bloombrick Urban Agriculture—an indoor farm located in the heart of Cambridge—grows and sells still-living microgreen, wheatgrass and other select produce in hydroponic and soil systems. Bloombrick aims to help cities become completely sustainable, 100 percent local and effectively regenerative, starting with Boston.

3. City Growers, with the assistance of community partners, helps to reclaim and secure discarded parcels of land throughout the city for growing food. By transforming these abandoned lots into “intensive urban farms that are economically and environmentally sustainable,” City Growers can offer its members livable wages by increasing local agricultural production and opening up local access to inexpensive and nutritious foods.

4. CitySprouts offers a school gardening program that has been bolted onto the Boston Public School district’s curricula. CitySprouts services include: Classroom to Garden, which supports educators as they expand their lessons into the school gardens; Food Education through food-producing school gardens; and CitySprouts Summer Intern Program, which helps youth build connections with their local food system and the surrounding natural environment.

5. The Food Project leverages sustainable agriculture to create social and personal change among Massachusetts youth. Since 1991, the Food Project has provided kids and teens with food system and food justice experience. They have farms across the state, including several urban farms in Boston. The food produced on Boston’s farms helps fund the Dudley Town Common farmers’ market and numerous local hunger relief organizations.

6. Green City Growers transforms vacant space into urban farms. They help people of various skill levels with gardens by converting yards, rooftops, and vacant lots into prosperous, organic vegetable gardens and farms.

7. Higher Ground Farm is Boston’s first rooftop farm, located on a 55,000-square-foot space atop the Boston Design Center. Higher Ground Farm grows and sells greens, tomatoes and herbs to local restaurants. Starting in 2014, the farm will be offering community supported agriculture shares and selling its produce at local farmers markets.

8. ReVision Urban Farm, a community-based agriculture project, uses its fields to feed homeless individuals and families who are a part of Victory Programs. The produce is free for those in need and made affordable for other community members. Additionally, ReVision Urban Farm also offers information about sustainable farming, and provides job training for the youth and homeless in the community.

9. The Urban Farming Institute of Boston’s mission is “to contribute to healthy people and sustainable cities by promoting and creating self-sustaining urban farming enterprises and farming jobs.” The institute does so by creating farms, providing farmer training, promoting public education and policy change and bringing people in urban neighborhoods closer to food production.

10. Urban Hydr-”O”-Farmers is comprised of high school students enrolled in the Hydroponics track of Boston College’s College Bound Program. They grow food hydroponically in a small greenhouse on Boston College’s campus, enabling them to grow year-round, and sell the produce at farmer’s markets in Boston.

The article is reproduced in accordance with Section 107 of title 17 of the Copyright Law of the United States relating to fair-use and is for the purposes of criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research.

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