Can DNA Send "Electromagnetic Imprints" of itself into Distant Cells and Fluids?

Vatic Note: ;I love rabbit holes. Look what I found.  We have done volumes on this blog with respect to manipulating our DNA. But we have never covered DNA sent out from within ourselves to other elements within our bodies and we did only one blog on the "Mysteries of Water" which is connect to this.  I wondered why our water has been viciously attacked, I knew why on our food since that is obvious it attacks our DNA, but water was not clear to me  Notice he has filed for a patent on "detecting" phantm replica of DNA in water.  We did a whole series on Water on this blog and it was mind blowing what real healthy water can do. Google "Vatic Project - Secrets of water". They took it down once, but we got it back up due to a reader in England who saved it and offered to give it back to us and she did.   So  now if you do read it, download it. Its a series of videos and the experiments done on water and its deep connection to the sun, us and our DNA.  ITS AMAZING WHAT WE DID NOT KNOW.

It was so bizarre, it was like science fiction. But it was not. One of the examples covered in the video series and article was that of a man who, as a child, was taken from his home and placed in an adoption facility to be adopted.  This was in another country, and he was very very young, so he had little memory of his original home country or place where he lived.   In walking through a woods in that country, in an area he believed he was from,  He drank from a stream and guess what???  He remembered where his home was, but it was never in his conscious memory until he drank from that stream.  That and other examples are priceless for showing just how magical our DNA is and now it explains after reading this below, why the powers that be are afraid of us and why they are trying to alter our DNA.

I strong recommend you revisit that blog on water and the videos involved.   It will make this below even more important that it appears to be on the surface.  Wow, the veils are lifting big time.

DNA Replication at a Distance–reported by Nobel scientist, likely building on research first published in 1992 by Russian scientists, Garaiev and Poponin

January 28, 2011

Luc Montagnier
The joint winner of the Nobel Prize for medicine in 2008, Luc Montagnier, is claiming that DNA can send ‘electromagnetic imprints’ of itself into distant cells and fluids which can then be used by enzymes to create copies of the original DNA. You can read;the original paper here [PDF]. (Source)  Montagnier also filed for a U.S. patent on the technology of detecting phantom replica of DNA in water:http://www.freepatentsonline.com/20110027774.pdf
The popular press and self-appointed blog experts, without bothering to investigate any further, have decided to misrepresent this important work as “teleportation” or “magic”. For example:
Characterizing Dr. Montagnier’s work as “teleportation” or “magic” is an obvious misrepresentation and creates ridiculous controversy. It appears to be intended to discredit Dr. Montagnier and his important work.
Read the rest of this blog post and decide for yourself if it is science or “magic”.  Inquiring minds might ask why recent work by a Nobel Scientist might need to be ridiculed?
Silly question.
.               DNA waves and water, Dec. 2010
L. Montagnier, J. Aissa2, E. Del Giudice, C. Lavallee2, A. Tedeschi, and G. Vitiello
Abstract. Some bacterial and viral DNA sequences have been found to induce low frequency electromagnetic waves in high aqueous dilutions. This phenomenon appears to be triggered by the ambient electromagnetic background of very low frequency. We discuss this phenomenon in the framework of quantum field theory. A scheme able to account for the observations is proposed. The reported phenomenon could allow to develop highly sensitive detection systems for chronic bacterial and viral infections. (Source)
According to Matti Pitkanen:
HIV Nobelist L. Montagnier’s group has published two articles challenging the standard views about genetic code and providing strong support for the notion of water memory. Already the results of the first article suggested implicitly the existence of a new kind nano-scale representation of genetic code and the the recent article makes this claim explicitly. . . The article “DNA waves and water” has created quite a furor even before its publication. . .The claim of Montagnier’s team is that the radiation generated by DNA affects water in such a manner that it behaves as if it contained the actual DNA. (Source)
The replication of DNA in “water” is accomplished using the PCR technique where the “water” has several components added to it as part of the PCR process–specifically, the “building blocks” to multiply DNA fragments. Dr. Montagnier apparently has shown how to use the PCR technique to multiply DNA in water that has been first imprinted with Garaiev and Poponin’s “phantom DNA” imprint. As theoretical chemist Jeff Reimers of the University of Sydney, Australia, points out:
“If the results are correct, these would be the most significant experiments performed in the past 90 years, demanding re-evaluation of the whole conceptual framework of modern chemistry.” (Source)
Montagnier has just taken a new position at Jiaotong University in Shanghai, China (this university is often referred to as “China’s MIT”), where he will work in a new institute bearing his name. This work focuses on a new scientific movement at the crossroads of physics, biology, and medicine: the phenomenon of electromagnetic waves produced by DNA in water. He and his team will study both the theoretical basis and the possible applications in medicine. (Source:French Nobelist Escapes “Intellectual Terror” to Pursue Radical Ideas in China.Science 24 December 2010: Vol. 330 no. 6012 p. 1732. DOI: 10.1126/science.330.6012.1732)
Similar to “DNA Phantom Effect” Research in 1992 by Russian Scientists
There has been Russian research, by Garaiev and Poponin, in related areas with similar results (layman’s overview). Garaiev and Poponin’s original work was published in 1992:
P.P. Gariaev, K.V. Grigor’ev, A.A. Vasil’ev, V.P. Poponin and V.A. Shcheglov. “Investigation of the Fluctuation Dynamics of DNA Solutions by Laser Correlation Spectroscopy.” Bulletin of the Lebedev Physics Institute, n. 11-12, p. 23-30 (1992).

Experimental set up
Vladimir Poponin, in his paper, “The DNA Phantom Effect: Direct Measurement of A New Field in the Vacuum Substructure” explains the experimental set up and procedures. (Source1Source2)  Garaiev and Poponin, if I understand correctly, used a laser light beamed through a DNA sample to create what they call a phantom DNA imprint pattern in a secondary medium at a distance. This phantom DNA imprint in the secondary medium was stable for up to a month. The Russian scientists speculated that the DNA phantom effect had something to do with the creation of an energy field. Garaiev and Poponin, provided additional follow-up comments in their 2002 paper, “Update on DNA Phantom Effect.” (Source).
Related work and/or commentaries include:
Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique
The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique supplies all the building blocks to multiply a DNA fragment:
PCR is used to amplify a specific region of a DNA strand (the DNA target). Most PCR methods typically amplify DNA fragments of up to ~10 kilo base pairs (kb), although some techniques allow for amplification of fragments up to 40 kb in size.[5]
A basic PCR set up requires several components and reagents. These components include:
* DNA template that contains the DNA region (target) to be amplified.
* Two primers that are complementary to the 3′ (three prime) ends of each of the sense and anti-sense strand of the DNA target.
* Taq polymerase or another DNA polymerase with a temperature optimum at around 70 °C.
* Deoxynucleotide triphosphates (dNTPs), the building blocks from which the DNA polymerases synthesizes a new DNA strand.
* Buffer solution, providing a suitable chemical environment for optimum activity and stability of the DNA polymerase.
* Divalent cations, magnesium or manganese ions; generally Mg2+ is used, but Mn2+ can be utilized for PCR-mediated DNA mutagenesis, as higher Mn2+ concentration increases the error rate during DNA synthesis[7]
* Monovalent cation potassium ions.
New Scientist reported the Luc Montagnier DNA Replication story as follows: (Source)
A Nobel prizewinner is reporting that DNA can be generated from its teleported “quantum imprint”
A STORM of scepticism has greeted experimental results emerging from the lab of a Nobel laureate which, if confirmed, would shake the foundations of several fields of science. “If the results are correct,” says theoretical chemist Jeff Reimers of the University of Sydney, Australia, “these would be the most significant experiments performed in the past 90 years, demanding re-evaluation of the whole conceptual framework of modern chemistry.”
Luc Montagnier, who shared the Nobel prize for medicine in 2008 for his part in establishing that HIV causes AIDS, says he has evidence that DNA can send spooky electromagnetic imprints of itself into distant cells and fluids. If that wasn’t heretical enough, he also suggests that enzymes can mistake the ghostly imprints for real DNA, and faithfully copy them to produce the real thing. In effect this would amount to a kind of quantum teleportation of the DNA.
Many researchers contacted for comment by New Scientist reacted with disbelief. Gary Schuster, who studies DNA conductance effects at Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, compared it to “pathological science”. Jacqueline Barton, who does similar work at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, was equally sceptical. “There aren’t a lot of data given, and I don’t buy the explanation,” she says. One blogger has suggested Montagnier should be awarded an IgNobel prize.
Yet the results can’t be dismissed out of hand. “The experimental methods used appear comprehensive,” says Reimers. So what have Montagnier and his team actually found?
Full details of the experiments are not yet available, but the basic set-up is as follows. Two adjacent but physically separate test tubes were placed within a copper coil and subjected to a very weak extremely low frequency electromagnetic field of 7 hertz. The apparatus was isolated from Earth’s natural magnetic field to stop it interfering with the experiment. One tube contained a fragment of DNA around 100 bases long; the second tube contained pure water.
After 16 to 18 hours, both samples were independently subjected to the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), a method routinely used to amplify traces of DNA by using enzymes to make many copies of the original material. The gene fragment was apparently recovered from both tubes, even though one should have contained just water (see diagram).
English: Luc Montagnier, Nobel Prize Laureate ...
Image via Wikipedia
DNA was only recovered if the original solution of DNA – whose concentration has not been revealed – had been subjected to several dilution cycles before being placed in the magnetic field. In each cycle it was diluted 10-fold, and “ghost” DNA was only recovered after between seven and 12 dilutions of the original. It was not found at the ultra-high dilutions used in homeopathy.
Physicists in Montagnier’s team suggest that DNA emits low-frequency electromagnetic waves which imprint the structure of the molecule onto the water. This structure, they claim, is preserved and amplified through quantum coherence effects, and because it mimics the shape of the original DNA, the enzymes in the PCR process mistake it for DNA itself, and somehow use it as a template to make DNA matching that which “sent” the signal (arxiv.org/abs/1012.5166).
“The biological experiments do seem intriguing, and I wouldn’t dismiss them,” says Greg Scholes of the University of Toronto in Canada, who last year demonstrated that quantum effects occur in plants. Yet according to Klaus Gerwert, who studies interactions between water and biomolecules at the Ruhr University in Bochum, Germany, “It is hard to understand how the information can be stored within water over a timescale longer than picoseconds.”
“The structure would be destroyed instantly,” agrees Felix Franks, a retired academic chemist in London who has studied water for many years. Franks was involved as a peer reviewer in the debunking of a controversial study in 1988 which claimed that water had a memory (see “How ‘ghost molecules’ were exorcised”). “Water has no ‘memory’,” he says now. “You can’t make an imprint in it and recover it later.”
Despite the scepticism over Montagnier’s explanation, the consensus was that the results deserve to be investigated further. Montagnier’s colleague, theoretical physicist Giuseppe Vitiello of the University of Salerno in Italy, is confident that the result is reliable. “I would exclude that it’s contamination,” he says. “It’s very important that other groups repeat it.”
In a paper last year (Interdisciplinary Sciences: Computational Life Sciences, DOI: 10.1007/s12539-009-0036-7), Montagnier described how he discovered the apparent ability of DNA fragments and entire bacteria both to produce weak electromagnetic fields and to “regenerate” themselves in previously uninfected cells. Montagnier strained a solution of the bacterium Mycoplasma pirum through a filter with pores small enough to prevent the bacteria penetrating. The filtered water emitted the same frequency of electromagnetic signal as the bacteria themselves. He says he has evidence that many species of bacteria and many viruses give out the electromagnetic signals, as do some diseased human cells.
Montagnier says that the full details of his latest experiments will not be disclosed until the paper is accepted for publication. “Surely you are aware that investigators do not reveal the detailed content of their experimental work before its first appearance in peer-reviewed journals,” he says.
Popsci.com reported the story as follows:
DNA Teleportation Nobel Prize winner Luc Montagnier describes a phenomenon in which DNA emits electromagnetic signals of its own construction, “ghost DNA” that can be mistaken by enzymes as the real deal and replicated in another place. Essentially, it’s DNA teleportation. Montagnier, et al.
A Nobel prize winning scientist who shared the 2008 prize for medicine for his role in establishing the link between HIV and AIDS has stirred up a good deal of both interest and skepticism with his latest experimental results, which more or less show that DNA can teleport itself to distant cells via electromagnetic signals. If his results prove correct, they would shake up the foundations upon which modern chemistry rests. But plenty of Montagnier’s peers are far from convinced.
The full details of Montagnier’s experiments are not yet known, as his paper has not yet been accepted for publication. But he and his research partners have made a summary of his findings available. Essentially, they took two test tubes – one containing a fragment of DNA about 100 bases long, another containing pure water – and isolated them in a chamber that muted the earth’s natural electromagnetic field to keep it from muddying the results. The test tubes were housed within a copper coil emanating a weak electromagnetic field.
Montagnier and his team say this suggests DNA emits its own electromagnetic signals that imprint the DNA’s structure on other molecules (like water). Ostensibly this means DNA can project itself from one cell to the next, where copies could be made – something like quantum teleportation of genetic material, a notion that is spooky on multiple levels.
.So What?
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